Alabama

Fossil tracks (traces), Image Credit: Diana Poppelreuter

(See more about this image below)

Instructions for adding/updating a club pin

Clubs can fill out and submit the form above to have a pin added/updated to the SFMS map. The information must be verified by the state director before a pin can be added/updated. The following are needed for the pin:

  • Club Name

  • Meeting Location (can be city, state if the club does not have a consistent meeting location)

  • Physical Mailing Address

  • Website (leave blank if not applicable)

  • Facebook Page (leave blank if not applicable)

The following information is also included to help people learn about your club:

  • Youth Activities (Y/N) - Does your club have a group and/or activities for children and teens?

  • Rock Pals (Y/N) - Does your club participate in the AFMS Rock Pals program where juniors trade rocks and fossils with juniors in other Rock Pals clubs?

  • FRA Club (Y/N) - Does your club participate in the AFMS Future Rockhounds of America program for juniors?

  • Lapidary Workshop (Y/N) - Does your club have a lapidary workshop or access to a lapidary workshop for club members?

  • Field Trips (Y/N) - Does your club provide field trips for your members?

  • Rock Show (Y/N) - Does your club have a rock show?

  • Educational Outreach (Y/N) - Does your club participate in community events, STEM events, school events, or other educational events?

You will have to provide an email address so the state director can contact you. Once you submit the form, please allow 1 to 2 weeks for your state director to review the information.

About the image on this page

Trace Fossil Tracks

Once upon a time, a small amphibian or reptile, casually dragging its tail, strolled across a muddy tidal flat in Alabama. About 318 million years later, a lucky rockhound on a club field trip found the tracks and tail drag left by that creature. Markings like these are called trace fossils because they were not part of the body of an organism like other fossils. Rather, they are an indication of the activity of an organism.

Image Credit: Diana Poppelreuter